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BiogeographicAssessments/NCCOS_MHIMarineBiogeographicAssessment (MapServer)

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Service Description: The state of Hawai‘i is working to develop local renewable energy sources to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels. Most of the State’s potential renewable energy resources (notably, wind) are located in federal waters from 3 to 200 nm offshore. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) regulates the leasing, construction and operation of renewable energy projects in federal waters, and is required to evaluate potential human, coastal and marine impacts from these projects. BOEM partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to gather biogeographic information in support of this evaluation around the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). The complexity of products from this assessment range from simple animal distribution maps to mathematical models depicting the predicted distributions of animals. Biogeographic analyses and data products were specifically tailored to meet BOEM’s needs, and designed to fit within BOEM’s framework of offshore lease blocks. This biogeographic assessment addresses three main questions: (1) how are select species or taxonomic groups distributed spatially and temporally around the MHI?; (2) what environmental conditions influence these distributions?; and (3) what significant gaps exist in our knowledge about the biogeography of the area? To answer these questions, readily-available spatial information was compiled and synthesized, including information on the physical and biological environment, benthic habitats, fishes, sea turtles, marine mammals, and seabirds. The assessment focused on federal waters and taxa that were: (1) more likely to interact with renewable energy infrastructure, (2) culturally significant, (3) legally protected, and/or (4) economically valuable. Collaborations with local managers, scientists, and experts from a variety of federal, state, academic and non-governmental organizations were crucial. These partners contributed their data, time and expertise, and many were contributing coauthors on the final report. The biogeography of the MHI is shaped by atmospheric and oceanographic conditions that operate at different temporal and spatial scales around the islands. Marine animals respond to these changing conditions in different ways. Some taxonomic groups and species use the same locations year round (e.g., on Penguin Bank or offshore of the Kona Coast, Hawaiʻi), while most taxa utilize different geographic areas at different times of the year. Understanding these spatial and temporal patterns is critical for marine spatial planning efforts. For some taxa, this marine biogeographic assessment marks the first time that their space-use patterns were mapped or modeled in the MHI, and the associated data compilation made available online. It establishes a baseline for assessing potential impacts, a guide for monitoring change, a roadmap for prioritizing how to fill data gaps, and a framework for integrating ocean research and management efforts moving forward.

Map Name: Marine Biogeographic Assessment of the Main Hawaiian Islands - Example Datasets

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All Layers and Tables

Layers: Description: NOTE: The layers presented here only represent a small sample of the spatial information compiled during this assessment. The entire data package is publicly avaialble for download on NOAA's NCEI's website: https://www.nodc.noaa.gov/access/index.html. The data providers, BOEM, and NOAA, make no warranty, expressed or implied, regarding these data, nor does the fact of distribution constitute such a warranty. The data providers, BOEM and NOAA, cannot assume liability for any damages caused by any errors or omissions in these data. For more information, please see: Costa, B.M. and M.S. Kendall (eds). 2016. Marine Biogeographic Assessment of the Main Hawaiian Islands. OCS Study BOEM 2016-035 and NOAA Technical Memorandum NOS NCCOS 214. Silver Spring, MD. 359 pp. Summary: The state of Hawai‘i is working to develop local renewable energy sources to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels. Most of the State’s potential renewable energy resources (notably, wind) are located in federal waters from 3 to 200 nm offshore. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) regulates the leasing, construction and operation of renewable energy projects in federal waters, and is required to evaluate potential human, coastal and marine impacts from these projects. BOEM partnered with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) to gather biogeographic information in support of this evaluation around the Main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). This ERDDAP/mapdap web service provides OPeNDAP access to scientific map data compiled and synthesized for this biogeographic assessment. The complexity of products from this assessment range from simple animal distribution maps to mathematical models depicting the predicted distributions of animals. Biogeographic analyses and data products were specifically tailored to meet BOEM’s needs, and designed to fit within BOEM’s framework of offshore lease blocks. This biogeographic assessment addresses three main questions: (1) how are select species or taxonomic groups distributed spatially and temporally around the MHI?; (2) what environmental conditions influence these distributions?; and (3) what significant gaps exist in our knowledge about the biogeography of the area? To answer these questions, readily-available spatial information was compiled and synthesized, including information on the physical and biological environment, benthic habitats, fishes, sea turtles, marine mammals, and seabirds. The assessment focused on federal waters and taxa that were: (1) more likely to interact with renewable energy infrastructure, (2) culturally significant, (3) legally protected, and/or (4) economically valuable. Collaborations with local managers, scientists, and experts from a variety of federal, state, academic and non-governmental organizations were crucial. These partners contributed their data, time and expertise, and many were contributing coauthors on the final report. The biogeography of the MHI is shaped by atmospheric and oceanographic conditions that operate at different temporal and spatial scales around the islands. Marine animals respond to these changing conditions in different ways. Some taxonomic groups and species use the same locations year round (e.g., on Penguin Bank or offshore of the Kona Coast, Hawaiʻi), while most taxa utilize different geographic areas at different times of the year. Understanding these spatial and temporal patterns is critical for marine spatial planning efforts. For some taxa, this marine biogeographic assessment marks the first time that their space-use patterns were mapped or modeled in the MHI, and the associated data compilation made available online. It establishes a baseline for assessing potential impacts, a guide for monitoring change, a roadmap for prioritizing how to fill data gaps, and a framework for integrating ocean research and management efforts moving forward.

Copyright Text: Project funded by Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Pacific Outer Continental Shelf Office

Spatial Reference: 102100  (3857)


Single Fused Map Cache: false

Initial Extent: Full Extent: Units: esriMeters

Supported Image Format Types: PNG32,PNG24,PNG,JPG,DIB,TIFF,EMF,PS,PDF,GIF,SVG,SVGZ,BMP

Document Info: Supports Dynamic Layers: false

MaxRecordCount: 1000

MaxImageHeight: 4096

MaxImageWidth: 4096

Supported Query Formats: JSON, AMF

Min Scale: 0

Max Scale: 0



Child Resources:   Info

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